Bottled Liquid Explosives Detection Solution

Explosive Liquid Detection technology via nuclear magnetic resonance

Many threats to the security of your company or facility lie in uncertainty. It is difficult to check for every little thing, which is precisely why many security measures must be automated by AI or technology that can assist us in keeping personnel safe.

Our gunshot detection systems do this incredibly well through the use of cutting edge machine learning and advanced visual systems to recognize threats before they have a chance to act. However, many large public facilities require extra measures in the prevention of explosive liquids being brought onto the premises.

Smart CT Solutions Bottled Liquid Explosives Detection is the perfect solution to prevent such attempts at terror.

Dangers and Difficulties Regarding Liquid Explosives

After the 9/11 terror attacks that changed the nation, another thing that changed dramatically was our perception of security measures—particularly in airports. Gone were the innocent days of lax security measures and limited screening with the TSA.

One of the concerns at that time—and still a concern, was being able to screen for liquid explosives which a person could attempt to sneak onto a plane. Screening for explosives was nothing new, but liquid explosive agents are much more difficult to scour for than say, a solid explosive device that may have residues or other tell-tale signs.

A plot foiled by the CIA involving a man, Abdulla Ahmed Ali, helped give birth to the airline policy of banning liquids on flights beyond a certain quantity. This was a consequence of realizing that Ali—in what was known as the 2006 transatlantic aircraft plot, was attempting to bring separate liquids onto flights and mix them mid-flight to create powerful explosives.

Liquids can be more difficult to detect as they may be securely kept in a seemingly innocuous container such as a shampoo bottle. While the banning of such liquids beyond a certain amount may work for airlines, it does not work nearly as well as for public facilities such as schools, hospitality organizations, parks, stadiums, concert halls, etc.

Smart CT’s Bottled Liquid Explosives Detection

The Smart CT BLS offers advanced liquid screening for explosives that a person may attempt to sneak into your facility or public location. Nuclear magnetic resonance technology is used to screen bottles within a matter of seconds. Quick scan time is crucial to efficiently allow acceptable personnel beyond the security checkpoint.

  • Minimal user intervention
  • No image interpretation
  • No lasers or ionizing radiation
  • No need to remove bottles from packaging
  • Links to data management systems

Are just some of the features this system provides that enables it to provide a robust user experience. This device is suitable for use in airports, courthouses, embassies, and other facilities that require advanced screening methods for explosives without causing excessive wait to enter the building.

How is the Smart CT BLS Used?

Our liquid explosive detection solution requires minimal user interaction to function appropriately. Simply insert the bottle to be inspected into the circular slot and press the large inspect button on the screen to screen the container. If there is a hazardous material found, an alarm will sound in seconds. If not, a sound to indicate that the bottle is cleared will also ring.

Liquid Explosives Detection Solution Public Security

Smart CT Solutions is dedicated to bringing you the most advanced and functional security detection systems to aid efforts in keeping your event or facility safe from wrongdoing.

Our gunshot detection and weapons detection systems have been in great demand for schools, courthouses, stadiums, and other places where there are large gatherings of people. People should feel safe when going out into public spaces. Smart CT would like to be your partner in securing the safety of your facility.

Contact us today to consult with us on our safety solutions.

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